Interstellar Travel: Hawking aims for Alpha Centauri

In the announcement of the most ambitious space exploration project yet Prof. Stephen Hawking set out a plan, with financial backing from investors such as Yuri Milner and Mark Zuckerberg, to send a spacecraft to our neighbouring star in the coming decades. The proposal named ‘Breakthrough Starshot’, sees a $100 million investment in the development…

Oscillating Neutrinos: The 2015 Physics Nobel Prize

On the 6th October 2015 researchers Takaaki Kajita (University of Tokyo) and Arthur McDonald (Queen’s University, Canada) won the 2015 physics Nobel prize for there career long research into the unusual behavior of the fundamental Leptonic particle the Neutrino. The standard model of particle physics predicts the existence of three flavours of Leptons the electron, the…

Starting my PhD

Hi Readers, Once again I have been a bit quiet over the last month as I have been settling into my PhD in Cosmology and Gravitation at the ICG University of Portsmouth. I will write a post soon about the science behind my work, but I can give you an overview that I am using…

The Far Side of the Moon

A series of images taken by the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) gives us a rare glance at the surface of the far side of the Moon. As our natural satellite is tidally locked with the Earth it always has the same side facing us throughout it’s orbit. The reason you can observe the far…

Kepler-452b: The Importance and Reality of the “Earth 2.0” Discovery

Yesterdays announcement by the NASA Kepler mission confirmed many new exoplanets discovered by the impressive telescope. Among these is the press self-proclaimed “Earth 2.0” or Kepler-452b. There are reasons to both get excited and be hesitant about these announcements. The raw facts released in the paper published to Astrophysical Journal – http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/ms-r1b.pdf – suggests that this…

Looking at the Dark Matter World

Hi readers of Physics Horizon. It has been a few months since there was the last news post! The reason for this is I have been working hard on my 4th year at University. I hope to be able to bring you more regular news in the coming weeks and I am really glad that…

Hannah’s sweet GCSE question that went viral

After a recent Edexcel GCSE paper students took to twitter to vent their frustration at the question which arose in their exam. This question stated that “There are n sweets in a bag, 6 of these are orange the rest are yellow. Hannah takes a random sweet and eats it. Following this she takes another…

Physics Horizon to Begin Regular Posts Very Soon!

Hi Readers, Physics Horizon has been very much stagnant for a while now, but I am still very thankful for such a constant stream of readers who seem to really enjoy even the now archival new articles. With my final examinations for my degree coming to a close in just under a months time, I…

How to make an Invisibility Cloak

For many years there have been a number of theories of how to achieve cloaking through different branches of Physics. At the University of Rochester they have succeeded in producing an effective multi-directional cloak out of a series of 4 readily available lenses. This has very exciting implications as it would mean that anyone can…

Traces of Water found in the Atmosphere of an Exoplanet

On the day that India managed to place a satellite in orbit around the red planet another massive announcement has been turning heads in the search for extraterrestrial life. One of the assumed requirements for life is water, however when searching on planets smaller than Jupiter they encountered a problem. All these planets seemed to…

Undergraduate Life: Observing the Moon

For my 18th birthday just under 4 years ago I was given a 6″ Celestron Newtonian Reflector telescope. Over the years I have had a few observing sessions and every so often when the sky is clear enough have attempted some astrophotography. Below are some of the photos I have taken of an observing session…

Bad News for Cosmic Inflation

A paper released today after careful analysis of the CMB (cosmic microwave background) map captured by the Planck satellite have revealed that contrary to the claim by the BICEP2 telescope of polarisation in the photons from the CMB this could be purely due to unaccounted for galactic dust. The original BICEP2 evidence released in support of polarisation…