The Far Side of the Moon

A series of images taken by the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) gives us a rare glance at the surface of the far side of the Moon. As our natural satellite is tidally locked with the Earth it always has the same side facing us throughout it’s orbit. The reason you can observe the far…

Undergraduate Life: Observing the Moon

For my 18th birthday just under 4 years ago I was given a 6″ Celestron Newtonian Reflector telescope. Over the years I have had a few observing sessions and every so often when the sky is clear enough have attempted some astrophotography. Below are some of the photos I have taken of an observing session…

Undergraduate Life: High Altitude Balloons

During my degree I have been heavily involved with the University of Birmingham Astronomical Society and one of the major projects which has occurred whilst I have been at university has been the launch of a series of high altitude balloons. These balloons are massive and filled with a large amount of helium. The first…

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

This years international astronomy photographers have been chosen by the Royal Observatory Greenwich. Below are the winners of each category, see more at the Guardian – http://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2014/sep/18/astronomy-photographer-year-2014-royal-observatory-greenwich-pictures Aurora over a Glacier Lagoon James Woodend (UK), Earth & Space: winner and overall winner Hybrid Solar Eclipse 2 Eugen Kamenew (Germany), People & Space: winner The Horsehead Nebula…

Undergraduate Life: Comet hunting!

A short post following on from yesterdays article regarding the Rosetta mission. At the University of Birmingham we last year installed a half metre Ritchey-Chretein Cassegrain telescope in our observatory. During the last year since it’s introduction I have taken part in a few memorable earlier morning observing trips. I though I would post some…

Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition winner

A new exhibition has opened up at the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London which displays the winner and runners up of the competition. The winner in 2012 was taken by Martin Pugh of the Whirlpool Galaxy known in the Messier catalogue as M51. The competition was open up to all astrophotographers, judged by Sir Patrick Moore and others. This image of…